The platform role in the modern VC firm with Getro CEO, Evan Walden.

Rachel Qualls:

Welcome everyone to Venture 360’s podcasts, About All Things Venture Capital. My name is Rachel Qualls. I’m Venture 360’s co-founder, CEO and your host. Today, Evan Walden from Getro is joining us. Hi Evan.

Evan Walden:

Hey Rachel.

Rachel Qualls:

So as a former VC, there is a mantra I had for years, which is that we are betting on the jockey, but we buy the horse. And what that really means is that we’re buying stock of a company, but really the performance of that company is completely dependent on the people running it. People are so, so important in everything we do in venture capital, which is why I was so excited to have you on today. And I would love for you to start by telling our audience a little bit about your personal story and how you came to start Getro and what you guys do?

Evan Walden:

Sure. Yeah. So my personal story, after graduating college, I got a job in sales and realized that that company really wasn’t meaningful to me. The work wasn’t meaningful and started to understand how important meaningful work was to me and how many people didn’t have it. And that led me to starting my first business, which was a recruiting agency to help people find more meaningful jobs.

Evan Walden:

And during our work with the recruiting agency, we started noticing that a lot of the best candidates were coming through referrals and relationships. And those are the people who tended to get hired the most. But for our clients, they were having a really hard time scaling that channel. And so they would hire us.

Evan Walden:

So we thought that was really interesting and ultimately ended up leaving that recruiting agency to start Getro. And this was maybe back in 2016 and the idea was, can we tap into these private communities and networks and relationships and help companies hire faster through connections in their network? And at the same time, help people find better jobs through relationships and trust.

Evan Walden:

So we got really, really excited about that as a concept. And as we started to build the business, we started wondering how we could grow the business. And what kinds of networks really cared about recommendations and referrals. And we were actually fundraising for the company, and a lot of the investors we were talking to were kind of like, “Hey, this could actually work for us. Can we buy what you guys have?” And we didn’t expect that to be our first market, but we ended up selling our first product, which was a job board product to VCs and it ended up really taking off.

Evan Walden:

And so, we really ended up focusing in that market and over the last three years or so, we’ve grown that market quite a bit. So we now work with about 250 venture capital funds. We have some other kinds of clients as well that we’ll probably get into in the call if you want, but I think probably not. We’ll just focus on the VC market and we offer two different solutions.

Evan Walden:

The first is a product called Getro Jobs, where we basically aggregate all the open jobs across the portfolio. So anytime a portfolio company posts a job on their career page, we grab it, pull it in and put it on a job board that lives on the VC’s website.

Evan Walden:

And the second product is called the Getro Network. And with that product, you can basically build a private talent community. So anytime someone from the fund needs someone great, they can refer that person into the network and then portfolio companies can also login and we facilitate introductions.

Evan Walden:

So it’s been a big learning experience for me without having a background in venture. And now for the last couple of years, getting to know quite a few funds, understanding some of the trends around heads of platform, heads of talent, why VCs may build out a team like that, or why not? And yeah, maybe I’ll stop there, but that’s kind of the high level about us.

Rachel Qualls:

Yeah, I mean, I can think back to my portfolio years ago of how many companies were just kind of being run into the grounds. You had great products, great concepts, even traction, just not the right team of people. And if there was a quick, easy resource to reallocate, right? To be able to just put in a management team or again, just kind of shuffle talent in a way that made more sense, I think that we would have had a much, much higher performing portfolio.

Evan Walden:

Yeah. I’ll say, I think as venture capital has kind of exploded over the years, especially in the US, we’re seeing funds to also differentiate by adding value beyond just the financing. So as a company, obviously hiring is the number one problem that most early stage companies face. So it’s a great way for a fund to differentiate themselves and to add value, to kind of make sure that they’re competing for the best deals.

Rachel Qualls:

Oh, that’s interesting. So let’s dive into that a little bit, because some of the things that we like to talk about on the podcast are trends or things that people are seeing in the industry. Maybe, Evan, you could tell us a little bit more about this platform role and how it’s evolving over time in the venture funds?

Evan Walden:

Sure. Yeah. And I’ll say this is from an outside perspective, right? So I’ve never built a platform team and I’ve never worked in VC, so I’ll caveat with both of those things. But just say what I’ve been observing after talking to, I don’t know, probably at least 500 funds, probably more over the last couple of years.

Evan Walden:

So I’ve noticed is that usually the fund will start out with a structure where it’s kind of a typical hierarchy of a principal or an associate that’s helping to do diligence and supporting the general partners with making the investments. And then, at some point, the fund decides to bring on someone to support with things that are not related to the financing primarily, which I would broadly call the platform function even if not necessarily everyone is called that, not everyone has that job title.

Evan Walden:

And usually, it’ll start with one person who may be the head of platform. And they’re responsible for lots of different things, probably a really strong generalists. They may have five to 10 years of experience in their career. And their pie chart is usually supporting the internal team with a percentage of time supporting on things like recruiting and talent, making introductions, helping to field inbound questions from founders around problems that they’re having. And then, route the answers a way, whether that’s a connection to a service provider or connection to the right person within the fund or within the broader network of the fund.

Evan Walden:

And then from there, it can take a couple of different directions. I’d see most folks tend to take the talent direction just because it’s an easy way to help, and it’s very high leverage. So we’ll even see folks hire a head of talent that’s just responsible for supporting the portfolio with hiring recruiting needs. And typically, a head of talent could either be someone who has a background in recruiting and is actually running searches or some folks take a more holistic approach and think about doing things like training, hiring managers or recruiters within the portfolio companies around best practices, bringing more resources to bear for the portfolio specifically to talent. And so we kind of see it dovetail in those two directions.

Evan Walden:

And then some funds will actually hire a full-time recruiter. And usually, some of the big funds like Andreessen, for example, they have a whole recruiting team within their platform function, but most funds don’t have multiple recruiters, especially not funds that are on the smaller side. So that’s kind of how we’ve seen the evolution and thinking so far as our product is supportive for folks who are performing a more general platform function, a product like ours can be really helpful because it just gives a lot of leverage to that person. Bringing all those jobs together and bringing the network together in one place makes it much easier for them to make more introductions faster and using less email and that sort of thing.

Evan Walden:

So that can be a nice value add. And then, even as the platform function gets more mature and there may be folks who are focused on talent, we see the head of talent or internal recruiters focusing more on the executive level searches, typically. They may be helping the companies with hiring within the C-suite. And so a tool like ours becomes valuable to support with the lower level roles, or even up to the senior level roles. We’re not necessarily pitching our product as a way to hire the next COO of a Series C company, but it’s more of a way to manage the network. So if you have a recruiter working on one or two executive searches, they can also be doing more general networking with our product.

Rachel Qualls:

Fascinating. Yeah, I guess that’s one of those roles that by default would come to a fund manager, right? Because you happen to be the contact with the portfolio, but knowing that that’s evolving into its own role, like more portfolio support in your calling platform, it’s really, really interesting. It’s an interesting trend to be aware of. Can you explain and go a little bit deeper?

Evan Walden:

Yeah. So it’s funny because right around the time that we started company, this concept of the platform team within a venture fund started to become more popular. So we didn’t understand this at the time, but we’ve kind of tracked this trend now over the years. And if you’re curious about this, there’s a great group to check out. It’s VCplatform.com. And they’re basically a professional community of anyone in venture globally who works in a platform role.

Evan Walden:

That particular group that I just shared, when we first met them, I think they had maybe 20 or 30 members. It was started by Maria Palma and in New York City from Ari and a handful of other folks. And every year they’ve doubled or almost tripled their numbers. And I think now the last time I heard there was almost 1000 people in this group who are representing VCs all over the world that think that this is a valuable function. So I think for most of the larger funds have a platform team of some kind, and it’s almost becoming kind of table stakes for some of the bigger folks.

Rachel Qualls:

And so why do you think that VCs need to provide additional value outside of capital? Do you think they just find themselves getting bombarded with portfolio companies needing help and just in a way to protect their assets, finding ways to provide that help efficiently? Or is it they need to be deal competitive? Because this deal competitiveness is highly geographically segmented.

Evan Walden:

Yeah.

Rachel Qualls:

It depends on where you are as to whether or not you’re competing for deals, basically. But what do you think is actually just driving that?

Evan Walden:

There’s definitely a marketing component when it comes to deal competitiveness, but I don’t think that’s the primary reason that actually causes people to build out these teams, especially beyond just one individual on the team. I think the reality is that most VCs are helping their portfolio companies already in different ways. And they realize that hiring is an amazing way to help. And typically, the individual has a great network. If they’re venture capitalists, they’ve been in the community for quite a while, they’ve built lots of relationships, but it is very time-consuming to actually navigate those introductions, be proactive on that because it just takes a lot of time to understand what every company needs. And so usually they’re just helping a few of the companies maybe that they’ve led deals in or they’re on the board of.

Evan Walden:

And so I think as the fund gets larger, there’s more partners. There’s more people in the fund. The network becomes fairly expansive and it’s a huge asset to bring to bear, to support portfolio companies with their growth, but navigating that as an individual, alongside all the other things you have to do is just very time consuming. So I think hiring someone in the platform role can kind of aggregate that up to one person to be more efficient. At the end of the day, if the company is hiring great people and growing faster and having less turnover, then they’re going to generate better returns than the fund is going to meet their goals. So I think it’s a pretty quantitative thing, in terms of adding value to the bottom line of the fund.

Evan Walden:

But I do think that one of the challenges in this role is measuring success. A lot of these folks are measuring success based on successful introductions that they make or kind of like net promoter score type of metrics around how founders think about the platform role, but it’s a fairly new concept. And so I think the industry itself is still figuring it out.

Rachel Qualls:

So do you think that’s why you kind of hit this unintentional nerve with VCs? Is that when you were going out and kind of talking about raising [inaudible 00:12:37] like, “Hey, this is what we do.” And they’re like, “Oh my gosh, this is a huge headache I have because I’m trying to help my portfolio companies and protect my assets and talent acquisition is not what I do.” Which is what your product helps them organize their network effect in a way that makes it efficient for them to help their portfolio companies. Right?

Evan Walden:

Yeah, absolutely. I think we definitely got lucky on timing in that sense because we really have ridden the wave of this platform function really increasing with the funds. And I don’t think that the broader ecosystem really knows about this function yet. So there’s not a lot of tools specifically designed for people who run platform out of venture fund and it’s kind of a small market in that sense. And we can talk about that as well, as why we think that’s still very interesting from a business standpoint. But we’re definitely one of the first tools that is specifically targeting that user persona of the head of platform within a fund.

Evan Walden:

And so we designed it with those people literally, hand in hand. So a lot of the features that we’ve built are very specific to their needs and yeah, I mean, if you have 100 companies in your portfolio and you’re interested in helping them and you meet an amazing person, who’s very highly place able, how do you know which company to introduce that person to? How do you know what jobs are open? How do they know what to opt into? The back and forth over emails is just very time-consuming.

Evan Walden:

So we’ve tried to address some of those things and just increase the frequency of intros being made. And then, also I think we’re one of the only tools that helps measure the actual output. And so our Getro Jobs product measures things like clicks on jobs and how much traffic you’re generating for your portfolio. The Getro Network product tracks introductions. And so that really helps to bring more quantitative data to the process.

Rachel Qualls:

And so also how like a job seeker, let’s say… because lots of people want to work for startups, but it’s hard to find the startup, find the job, you know? So being able to go through a VC, because they go directly through the VCs website. Right? And they can get access to that?

Evan Walden:

Right. Yeah. And one thing that’s interesting that we noticed about job boards typically is that if everyone is forced to post a job manually, number one, people are not going to remember to do that. So the hiring managers, or the founders or the recruiters, they don’t think about all the different job boards. They’re usually just posting on a handful. So they may not remember to post on a niche job board, like a board on a VC’s website for example. So it doesn’t have all of the jobs in the portfolio. It just has the ones that people remember to post.

Evan Walden:

And then not to mention, they forget to take it down. So once a job is filled, no one’s thinking like, “Okay, what are the 50 job boards I posted this to?” They just move on. So, the data on manual job boards is incomplete and tends to be out of date.

Evan Walden:

So as a job seeker, when I’m going to that page and I see two jobs that are out of date, I’m thinking like, “Okay, I can’t really trust this as a resource.” And I don’t come back. But by aggregating jobs from the career pages directly, we have all of the jobs. And then we’re also taking jobs down when they’re getting taken down from the career page.

Evan Walden:

So it’s really nice because no one needs to do any manual work of posting jobs or taking jobs down. It’s just automatically happening in the background. And for the job seeker, they’re seeing job opportunities there that aren’t really on major job boards because maybe the company itself is thinking, “All right, we’ll spend $200 a job post on LinkedIn for these five jobs. But for the other five, we can probably find these easier. And so we’re just not going to post them.”

Evan Walden:

So, the inventory itself ends up being a bit hidden from job seekers unintentionally. So doing it this way unlocks that inventory in a way that we weren’t really thinking about initially, but we’ve been hearing that a lot from the job seekers.

Rachel Qualls:

Interesting. And in my very humble opinion, it would seem that the venture industry and earlier stage companies tend to attract some really, really high caliber talent because people who are really good at what they do really like to build things, be more directly involved in orchestrating the success of a company. So you attract a certain kind of person to earlier stage companies. I know you guys are supporting VC’s at every stage, but really you’re at hundreds and hundreds of employees, you’re still very early stage company. So really you’re also, kind of by default, developing a very robust database of pretty premier talent. Right?

Evan Walden:

Yeah. That actually makes me think of something that’s been happening over the last six months or how ever many months we’re in now. I feel like COVID has been a time warp. But yeah, we’ve seen that, in a lot of portfolios, there are companies that have been effective to the point where they need to do some pretty substantial layoffs. And the VC kind of becomes the central node where those portfolio companies can share talent with the VC. Then, the VC can share talent back out to another portfolio company that may be doing really well. So there are people coming in and out at the founder level who may be starting something and then have it fail. But even as the companies grow when there are situations like this that are totally unprecedented, the VC becomes a real player in the game beyond just the money conversation, but in the talent conversation, which in some cases it can be even more valuable.

Rachel Qualls:

Right. Exactly. So how do you guys make money? What’s the revenue model? Who gets charged what?

Evan Walden:

Yeah, so it’s a subscription model. So we charge the fund based on the number of companies in the portfolio and then the pricing kind of scales up as the fund scales in size.

Rachel Qualls:

So then they just put this on their website. Is that a link? I’m kind of getting into the details of it because I think by now people are probably like…

Evan Walden:

Yeah, so it’s just, we build out the page, we custom brand it for the fund so that it matches the look and feel of the website and the job seeker really feels like they’re still in the ecosystem of the fund itself. And then, it’s very easy to get started. We really just need a list of the portfolio companies and we build out the board, you approve the design and then we launch it and we maintain that page.

Evan Walden:

So there’s no technical integration necessary. And you could see examples if you go to like jobs.techstars.com or Gray Lock, Ian Square Ventures, Layer Hippo. We’re working with a bunch of funds. If you just kind of start Googling around jobs and some of the venture funds that you like, you can find some examples.

Rachel Qualls:

Geez Evan, no one’s ever heard of those.

Evan Walden:

Yeah. Well, I feel like when we were first starting out, I was like, “Oh God, this is hard.” And now I think we’ve definitely established ourselves well in the industry, which is really cool. And I mean, like I said, I had no real experience in VC, so it’s been very interesting to learn about the VC world through growing a product that serves them because it is. At the beginning, we would have very funny conversations where I’d be talking to someone and they’re kind of like asking me questions about the business. Like, “Well, what’s the big vision or how do you really feel?” Asking me strategy questions, I’m like, “Wait, this isn’t a pitch. I’m actually trying to sell you a job board.” We’d have a good laugh.

Rachel Qualls:

Oh, you don’t want to ever go to dinner with me because I can’t help [inaudible 00:20:00] conversation I’m ever having, I’m working revenue models and probabilities and I’m just the super nerd you really just don’t want to have around just anyone.

Evan Walden:

Well, it’s pretty great because I mean, to get free business consulting advice on every phone call, I mean, I think we definitely made strategic choices based on conversations we’ve had with customers in a way that if I was selling a different product in a different industry, I don’t think that would be happening as much.

Rachel Qualls:

Yeah. I mean, being a VC for as long as I was, it gives you a really interesting look because you have a very high level look at a lot of different kinds of businesses. At least we did because we weren’t industry specific. And so you do, you just kind of learn a vernacular for finding the holes in things because really that’s your job for the most part. If you’re going to invest in something, to identify holes, understand how they’re going to mitigate the risks and all those good things. But again, not great dinner conversation.

Rachel Qualls:

Evan, tell me a little bit about, because you’ve been on both sides of the table now because you’ve raised funding, right? You guys were in a tech [crosstalk 00:20:59]-

Evan Walden:

Yeah. Yeah. We went through the Techstars program in Boulder in 2017 and then, bootstrap the company up until the fourth quarter of 2019. So, fairly recently we raised a venture round at that point.

Rachel Qualls:

Way to get that in before the world fell out.

Evan Walden:

Oh my God. That was insane timing that nobody ever could have seen coming, but you were very happy about that.

Rachel Qualls:

I bet. I think it’s sometimes the coolest thing when life either works out… It always works out the way it’s supposed to. Right? But when you do something and you’re like, “Oh my gosh.” If you had even delayed it a quarter, right?

Evan Walden:

Yeah, which we were initially planning to do. And then, we just ended up meeting some folks who wanted to lead the round and it was a really good fit and we went for it. But yeah, it was very fortunate.

Rachel Qualls:

Look, you’re in with some really marquee names in the venture community, so kudos on that. You guys have gotten some really great traction. You obviously have a good product or they wouldn’t be using it. So what’s kind of the long-term vision and mission for where you guys are going to go next?

Evan Walden:

Yeah. So there’s two things as it relates to the VC community that we’re really excited about. I mean, there’s probably more, but a couple of things that come to mind. One is that we’ve noticed our customers telling us like, “Hey, this is great. You guys are helping with talent and making talent introductions, but actually make other kinds of introductions as well. So I might introduce my founders to mentors in my network who can help them solve specific problems, or I might be co-investing with other kinds of investors that I want to make introductions to, or that might be service providers that we’re connected to who we want to introduce. Can you help with that?”

Evan Walden:

So we’ve been thinking about how does the platform expand beyond just job seeking and into any kind of professional introduction that is happening within a professional network, like a venture fund. So that’s been one really exciting pathway that we’re looking forward to building toward.

Evan Walden:

The second thing that we’ve noticed is that some of the funds we talked to are interested in our help in filling the talent network. So they may have a great community or access to great talent within their personal networks, but they’re interested in having more exposure to other kinds of talent and then being given some credit for connecting those people to the portfolio companies. So we’ve been exploring different kinds of partnerships and relationships with professional communities, especially those who are focused on diverse populations to actually start sourcing talent and connecting that talent directly to the portfolio companies or through the venture fund relationship. And I think this is something that I hope we will continue to see momentum on.

Evan Walden:

If you’re paying attention at all in the tech community and in venture specifically, diversity has been a really big part of the conversation. And when it comes to referrals and introductions, there’s a typical critique that says, “If you look a certain way, you’re most likely to get referrals through your network to people who look like you do.” And so if that’s happening, how do we make sure that these ecosystems are more diverse and how do we make sure that there actually is equal opportunity for everyone? And to me, I think a really interesting answer is helping to connect VC communities with diverse communities who don’t typically get exposure to VCs but could be really interesting, both from a deal flow standpoint, but also from a talent standpoint for the portfolio companies.

Rachel Qualls:

Well, that is something near and dear to my heart as a female founder in the FinTech industry, right? Let alone forget trying to raise capital as a new fund manager and being female. That’s a whole other podcast and even being a female founder in FinTech, a more traditional FinTech founder obviously is not female. So that’s near and dear to my heart as well, just because I think as long as you’re a top performer, you should be able to get to the same starting line. And I think that’s the problem, is that the starting line is not the same for all of us. We all, I think, should have to compete fairly, but the starting line just isn’t fair.

Rachel Qualls:

So we have another podcast that we did earlier and is someone you should probably meet, because I’m also a big fan of Quant Funds. So funds that strictly invest based on quantitative data. The biggest criteria that one of the fund managers we interviewed previously, called Kinetic, is that they very purposefully do not screen for any personal biases. So they do not know the sex of the founder before they fund them. They don’t know the race, they don’t know the gender. I already said that, but you know, they eliminate all of these personal biases so that they’re funding the top performers. And their portfolio is a fascinating data set of how it’s really skewed towards a very diverse group and how certain people are outperforming others. It’s good stuff.

Evan Walden:

Yeah, that’s awesome. Yeah. I think some of that, some of the tools that are available to withhold that kind of information, can be really powerful to reduce unconscious bias in the moment of decision-making, both for investing and also for hiring. And I also think that actually tapping into these new communities that maybe a VC doesn’t have exposure to and sourcing people who don’t look like the typical portfolio founder can also be really interesting. And it’s tough, both for VCs and also for early stage companies when they’re hiring to do the work of going out and finding those communities that are different from them. And when you have a million on your plate, it does take some extra work to do that. I think it’s worth that work. And I also think that companies like ours can bring those communities to the table to make that work easier.

Evan Walden:

And I think if that’s happening, it increases the likelihood that the pipeline of hiring or the pipeline of investing will be full of more candidates who are diverse. So it doesn’t just rely on the unconscious bias in the decision making moment, but it’s actually bringing more people into those conversations.

Rachel Qualls:

And it’s even a bit of a self fulfilling prophecy right now, and self perpetuating because just like we opened to this podcast and part of the value you’re bringing to this VCs is they have this network effect, right? And it is a very closed network. So the venture community, typically, they’re sourcing deal flow from what they consider trusted third parties, right? And those trusted third parties are part of another closed network. So you end up just perpetuating kind of the same turn of people in companies and things.

Rachel Qualls:

And it’s the same with your hiring, right? You guys are providing network effect. It’s just that, unfortunately, that’s a very close to network and it’s probably that way, and it is that way, just because that’s the most efficient way to get them what they need quickly. And no one wants to review thousands and thousands of funding applications.

Rachel Qualls:

But with all of that being said, you’re also limiting your scope and in doing so, you’re cutting out a whole swath of potential, both deal flow and hiring and everything, if you’re not expanding that network, which I think to your point of, if we can find a way to expand the network outside of that closed group, in a way that eliminates personal bias, then we’re really onto something as a society, I think.

Evan Walden:

Yeah, totally. And I mean, we see outsize returns being generated in funds that are doing that well. So there’s a financial reason to do this. It’s not just like because you want to be a nice person and give people opportunity. It really does create out-sized outcomes when you have that. We have exposure to different angles and people with different kinds of ideas.

Rachel Qualls:

Yep. That’s the beauty of capitalism, right? I mean it perpetuates the end game. Again, there should be just fairness in the starting line, as long as the competition’s the same. So I think that’s pretty cool that you guys are cognizant of that, especially that the industry seem more cognizant of the fact that we could all be doing better. And especially if it helps the bottom line. To be honest, that’s our job.

Rachel Qualls:

Is there anything else that you kind of wanted to add before we close out the podcast here about maybe things that you’re seeing in the venture industry? Or I know you guys are a global company at this point, or in hiring or trends that venture funds should be aware of in hiring? Anything else that you’re seeing or want to leave?

Evan Walden:

Well, one interesting thing that we decided to do when COVID-19 hit was we started a new community ourselves called Getro.org, which is something that, it’s a pro bono resource to the community. And what we’ve done is we’ve created a list of companies that are still hiring in this moment, that are doing well. So there’s almost… I think there’s over 500 companies now on that list, where we’re aggregating all of their jobs there for job seekers to go check out what’s currently available.

Evan Walden:

We also power a talent newsletter, which we send out every week, that highlights the best people that… And by best, I just mean kind of most hire able people based on our subjective that we find from layoff lists or from people who are reaching out to us and signing up. And that’s a free resource. Anybody can sign up for it.

Evan Walden:

And also we’re happy to support venture funds. We do this for a bunch of our customers now if there is a layoff happening and we’re happy to connect those folks to the companies that we know who are hiring in our network. So that’s definitely something for folks to check out. And go ahead and sign up to if you’re interested in seeing that.

Evan Walden:

And I think, in terms of a broad trend, we’ve been a remote company from day one when we first started. So there’s been a lot of craziness with COVID, but fortunately we had some of the best practices of remote work pretty dialed, or at least we were aware of the problems before this all started to happen. I think we’re going to see some pretty interesting challenges pop up in three, six, nine months when companies that have been forced to go remote are starting to feel the pain of not having those best practices in place, or just not having individuals who get energy from working remotely.

Evan Walden:

And I’m curious to see what happens when we start getting into that zone. I think that folks will be more likely to feel burnout. There’ll be more important for leaders to be transparent with how they’re thinking about things, documentation, communication become a lot more important. When you’re remote, you can’t just grab somebody and ask them a question. So I think for VCs thinking about their investments and also just how to support their founders, really understanding the best practices of how to work remotely and sharing some of those resources with companies is just a super high leverage way to add value because everyone’s just figuring it out on the fly.

Evan Walden:

And even companies that have been remote for a long time, in a way, are figuring it out on the fly because the tools are now getting a lot better, but they’re not perfect. And there’s a lot of different foregrounds and hacks that people have come up with that, I think, because the VC had such an exposure to many different companies, they’re in a position where they can roll up some of the practices and share across the portfolio and add value in a way that an individual founder who’s got 50 fires burning at any time, maybe they’re reading a blog post or listening to a podcast here and there. But it’s very hard to curate the best content on the stuff. It’s just coming at you 100 miles an hour.

Evan Walden:

So being a curator of good content and good ideas, I think, is something that VCs are very well positioned to do.

Rachel Qualls:

Yeah. Agreed. There’s a whole other world that’s opening up at the end of this very dark tunnel. And in some ways it’s really, really exciting, but change is always a bit volatile too, right?

Evan Walden:

Yeah. And thank you for this opportunity.

Rachel Qualls:

Oh yeah. Well, you’re so welcome. I was just going to say, I can’t thank you enough for taking the time to come on today and talk a little bit about how Getro is really positioning the VCs to efficiently utilize networks to power the talent in their portfolio. And like I said, I think it’s really probably the most important thing in someone’s portfolio is the jockey, right? Like we talked about in the beginning.

Rachel Qualls:

So thanks again, Evan. I’ll be sure to link to Getro’s website, as I’m sure people are going to want to go and check you guys out. So thanks again.

Evan Walden:

Yeah. Thank you.

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